Sunflowers: Other Artists

Girl with Sunflowers

Vincent van Gogh's sunflower paintings opened a door to a new evolution in decor and art. Not only did Vincent van Gogh inspire others to paint sunflowers, but he also created a trend that would span various lifestyles and personas. Van Gogh's infamous sunflowers altered many views on color schemes, exaggerated features, and stereotypically beautiful flowers in minimalistic form.

The Painting to the left (Girl with Sunflowers or Muchacha con Girosoles) was created by 20th century artist Diego Rivera. Rivera was influenced strongly by Vincent van Gogh, but also portrayed his personal political message in his art. His paintings offer a lot of social commentary about the time period, and involve turbulent expressions of anti-establishment views. This particular painting is a possible parody of Euro-centrist art establishment. Rivera lived during a time when self-consciences is openly displayed in artwork; in this piece his spoof of the Impressionist's short vibrant brush strokes is vividly displayed behind the girl in the painting. Also, the girl is not a Caucasian. One may wonder if she is taking part in the European impressionists still life or is she the worker behind the scenes who made these famous still lifes possible. Never the less this painting still offers tribute to Van Gogh himself. Rivera, like Van Gogh, enjoyed portraying peasant life and flowers (mainly Calla Lilies instead of sunflowers). These Calla Lilies have become another trend inducing series of paintings.

Gogh Painting Sunflowers

The painting to the right (painted by Paul Gauguin) , much like Rivera's, is a tribute to Vincent van Gogh. However this tribute is different in the fact it expresses Gauguin's long friendship and interchanging artistic views. This piece depicts Vincent painting one of his famous sunflowers. Considering Gogh first painted his famous depiction of the sunflower for Gauguin to decorate his room with, it is understandable that he returned the favor of painting this image of Gogh working on one of his pieces.



Below you can view some artists that have also painted sunflowers and a brief summery of their work.



Alfred Gockel Name:Alfred Gockel
Birth/Death Date:1952--
To Learn More: Gockel Fine Art
Biography: Alfred Gockel is known for his bright flowing colors, and broad range of completed pieces. His artwork is uniquely identifiable and a pleasure to look at.


Alfred Gockel Painting One Alfred Gockel Painting Two Alfred Gockel Painting Three Alfred Gockel Painting Four
Gustav Klimt Name:Gustav Klimt
Birth/Death Date:1862--1918
To Learn More: Expo-Klimt
Biography: Gustav Klimt's art was viewed as to sensual and erotic for his time. Although 'The Kiss' is his most famous work, he had also painted two fairly important sunflower paintings.


Gustav Klimt Painting One Gustav Klimt Painting Two
M. G. Luffarelli Name:M. G. Luffarelli
Birth/Death Date:Unknown
To Learn More: Mgluffarelli.com--(English Translations Provided)
Biography: Luffarellis watercolors are bright and brilliant. These paintings expressively capture the nature of sunflowers and lighten up any environment. Her art has been exhibited around the world.


Luffarelli Painting One Luffarelli Painting Two Luffarelli Painting Three Luffarelli Painting Four
Vitali Komarov Name:Vitali Komarov
Birth/Death Date:1968--
To Learn More: Komarov Art
Biography: Vitali Komarov's contemporary impressionist paintings are outstanding! His grasp of color is wonderful and his use of if is even more amazing. His work is a personal favorite of mine. He has added a new modern twist to the impressionist style.

Sunflowers Paintings:
Komarov Painting One Komarov Painting Two Komorov Painting Three


To Return to Vincent van Gogh: Sunflowers.
Interior of a Restaurant in Arles Orchard with Blossoming Apricot Trees Outskirts of Paris near Montmartre View of The Hague with the New Church
Interior of a Restaurant in Arles Orchard with Blossoming Apricot Trees Outskirts of Paris near Montmartre View of The Hague with the New Church
"I can't work without a model. I won't say I turn my back on nature ruthlessly in order to turn a study into a picture, arranging the colors, enlarging and simplifying; but in the matter of form I am too afraid of departing from the possible and the true."